AFIS Internet Conference 2014

Salt Lake City, Utah...

An RX For Hospitals

Can a new telephone system save lives?...

Best of Interop 2104

ProgrammableFlow® Wins Management Category...

More cores. More threads. More memory. More I/O. 2X the performance.

Introducing NEC's new Express5800 Enterprise Server...

NEC and Microsoft

Delivering Open, Standards-Based SDN for Cloud...

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AFIS Internet Conference 2014

Salt Lake City, Utah ...

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An RX For Hospitals

Can a new telephone system save lives? ...

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Best of Interop 2104

ProgrammableFlow® Wins Management Category ...

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More cores. More threads. More memory. M

Introducing NEC's new Express5800 Enterprise Server ...

News Image

NEC and Microsoft

Delivering Open, Standards-Based SDN for Cloud ...

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On premise, cloud, or hybrid communicati

Watch now ...

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NEC Corporation of America (NEC) is sponsoring a meet-up in Sunnyvale, CA, on Sept. 11, featuring a panel of industry experts discussing how to leverage technology and innovation for proactive healthcare.

Healthcare providers are increasingly under budgetary pressure to reduce costs and increase the efficiency and quality of care.  Preventive treatments free up costly hospital resources.  Technology is proving to be a key enabler in realizing these goals, especially as healthcare delivery models are evolving rapidly.

To improve wellness worldwide, innovators from across healthcare are envisioning and realizing game-changing digital health technologies.  Come hear real-world approaches, first-hand experiences and lessons learned from trailblazers on the leading edge of healthcare.

Details of the meet-up:

When:  Thursday, September 11 from 6 - 8:30 p.m.

Where:  Plug and Play Tech Center

Address:
440 N Wolfe Rd
Sunnyvale, CA 94085

Register for this event.

Moderator

Charlene Yu Vaughn, CEO, The Algonquin Group

Panel of Experts

  • Dr. Andrew Auerbach, MD, MPH, Director of InnovaEon at the Center for Digital Health InnovaEon; Professor of Medicine in Residence at UCSF
  • Jason Roos, CTO, Stanford Medical Center

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If you stop to think about it, the relational database (RDBMS) is a pretty remarkable piece of technology. Can you name another product category that has remained essentially unchanged since it was first introduced roughly 40 years ago?

However, in 2014 the RDBMS is no longer the “be all and end all” of database technology. An RDBMS can’t meet the demands placed on it by big data and cloud computing. Data entry has changed dramatically also. Instead of a requirement to scale with the number of data processing employees, there is now a requirement to scale with the number of customers, or to give a more dramatic example, to scale with the number of devices or sensors in a machine-to-machine (M2M) or Internet of Things (IoT) scenario. Many enterprises have outgrown their RDBMS, as have most telecommunications providers.

All up and down the application stack we can see the ability to scale out and in quite easily. By definition, big data requires an elastic database that can scale across multiple storage and compute nodes. Other technology that was created to be elastic, such as NoSQL and NewSQL, are more appropriate for big data environments.

How to Know if You Need Elasticity

Not every project requires an elastic database. When one does, things go much more smoothly if you can figure that out in advance and plan accordingly. It’s much easier if you make the effort to plan for an elastic architecture from the beginning. Look at your planned load and your projected growth and ask yourself whether it will exceed the capacity of your current hardware/software architecture. Will your database requirements fluctuate in demand? Will there be daily, weekly, monthly, and/or seasonal changes in the number of servers required? For example, if you have an analytics application that requires eight database nodes 24x7, yet peaks at 14 nodes for four hours every night, then elasticity is important.

NoSQL, NewSQL, and Elasticity

When NoSQL systems were initially being designed, emphasis was placed on scalability. In many cases, this meant eliminating many of the features that had been added to RDBMSs over time: powerful query languages, database consistency guarantees, durability, atomic operations – and just about everything else. At this point we had lots of elastically scalable databases that offered little else, whereby making them unusable except for very specific use cases.

NewSQL goes beyond NoSQL and stipulates that elasticity isn’t the only thing that matters and is instead a baseline requirement. Many of the things that we gave up (such as SQL) in our quest for elasticity are important. NoSQL required many of these things to be built into applications (increasing complexity and cost) and now we want them back in the database layer where they belong.

IERS is Built for Elasticity

In addition to having elasticity in its name, NEC’s InfoFrame Elastic Relational Store (IERS) was designed from the very beginning to provide a high-performance elastically scalable database with full ACID capabilities. IERS’ scale-out architecture expands your system without downtime as demand and data volume increases. This allows you to start small, save on unnecessary resource investments and then scale out easily based on demand. Minimal to no application modification is required to scale out or in.

IERS is Built for Elasticity

IERS can scale out easily and quickly. System resource can be added while the system is live and in production, enabling the system to be reconfigured on-the-fly without downtime. Also, as the system scales out, automatic rebalancing of the data takes place. This process does not impact user operations. IERS sports an easy to use web based GUI that allows administrators to scale-in/scale-out with a few clicks from anywhere in the globe. Process once initiated requires no further human intervention.

To learn more about NEC’s IERS solution visit:  http://goo.gl/TnFkbR

    *Matt Sarrel is a leading tech analyst and writer providing guest content for NEC.


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In my last blog post I provided a general introduction to key value stores (KVS). In this post I’m going to explain how InfoFrame Elastic Relational Store (IERS) takes the basic concepts of the KVS and improves upon them to build a database with strong business oriented features.

The main improvement is that IERS is built to process high-speed transactions with full ACID capabilities. As a quick refresher, ACID stands for Atomicity, Consistency, Isolation, Durability and refers to the set of properties that deliver reliable processing of database transactions. Atomicity preserves transaction integrity by only allowing complete transactions to be committed, not just parts of transactions. Consistency allows for well-defined rules to control and validate the data before it is written to the database. Isolation verifies that concurrent execution of transactions still results in complete transactions being committed; this is where conflict resolution takes places. Durability means that once a transaction has been committed it will remain intact even in the event of power loss, crashes, or other system errors. IERS offers full ACID support and thus meets the requirements for a business environment processing transactions, which many KVS fail to meet.

Most KVS cannot guarantee the constraints that developers need to place on data in order to preserve consistency. Consistency needs to be handled by the application, which pushes this critical function further away from the database engine and makes it more cumbersome to design the application as the application must now include features the database should handle. On the other hand, IERS provides consistency at the database layer, preserving the high performance of KVS.

Whereas most KVS require database-specific code to be written, IERS uses an industry standard SQL interface. Most KVS platforms don’t support SQL, hence the name NoSQL being used as a term to describe them. Over time, NoSQL as a term has expanded to include next-generation databases with a SQL interface by rebranding itself as “Not Only SQL.” Some industry analysts refer to next-generation databases with a SQL interface as NewSQL. However, the most commonly used database programming language is SQL and many business environments already have a significant investment in SQL. For these reasons, SQL support is one of the most important and most used features of IERS. Using another KVS might require developers to learn a custom API, thus delaying the development process. IERS, with its SQL support, allows developers to get up and running as fast as possible.

Database security is also a requirement in a business environment. IERS provides the same user authentication and table level access management as an RDBMS. In contrast, the typical KVS will push this up to the application layer. IERS also offers full support for user activity logging and can be integrated with a solution like IBM Guardium to provide complete audit trails.

IERS also fully supports range queries, a common database operation that retrieves all records where some value is between an upper and lower boundary. For example, list all customers between ages 8 and 18. A typical KVS cannot support a range query. In fact, a typical KVS only supports queries on the key.

As you can see, IERS contains many enhancements that are typically not found in a KVS. When the database layer lacks such functionality, then it must be implemented in the application layer. This requires the application layer to manage transactions, security, data constraints and consistency. It’s much easier to simply use a database that contains this functionality such as IERS. By including the functionality described in this posting, IERS demonstrates that it is more applicable for use in solving business problems than a typical key value store. The most important of these enhancements is full support for ACID transactions; without ACID there cannot be transactions. Businesses evaluating NoSQL and NewSQL key value stores for a high-speed transaction driven environment will find that IERS more than meets their needs.

To learn more about NEC’s IERS solution visit:  http://goo.gl/TnFkbR

    *Matt Sarrel is a leading tech analyst and writer providing guest content for NEC.


( 0 Votes )

Key Value Stores are perhaps the most common form of NoSQL and NewSQL databases.  They consist of (surprise!) keys and values and are built from the ground up to store and retrieve these values as fast as possible.  For this reason, a KVS is considered an excellent way to store and retrieve information for high-traffic web sites and other high-performance content, but not the greatest for transaction-driven projects.   According to DB-Engines, key value stores are one of the more popular non-RDBMS databases in use.

Structurally, KVS are the most straightforward of the NoSQL databases and this basic underlying factor accounts largely for why they are so mind-bogglingly fast.  The beauty of a KVS is its simplicity.  Instead of worrying about complex schema and data relationships (as with a traditional RDBMS), a KVS just has to store and retrieve values linked to a key.  The most commonly implemented KVSs include Redis, Riak, and VoldemortNEC’s IERS is built on top KVS with many added enhancements.

It’s easier to understand a KVS if you first look at a traditional RDBMS.  Think of this as a structured and table-based database.  For example, if you’re working with employee data, you’d have a table with columns for each field you wanted to track and a row for each user.  It would look something like this:

ID

First Name

Last Name

1

Homer

Simpson

2

Marge

Bouvier

3

Herschel

Krustofsky

The table approach works well if you have a reasonable number, a few dozen to a few thousand, of people to track.  It also works well if you can do your queries off-line where speed isn’t an issue, and can do your batch processing for reporting at off hours because those reports will take a considerable amount of time.

However, in the big data world we don’t have the luxury of running queries and reports during off-hours.  Whatever it is, in the big data world we need it now.  Not only that, the traditional table shown above may become a big management mess when it’s too big to fit on a single server. Taking the example to a KVS, imagine that you’ve got users instead of employees.  Now you’re talking about millions of records instead of thousands, and they need to be available quickly from around the world 24/7.  When a user logs in, he wants to be able to have instant access to his account.  Plus, not every user record has every bit of information as every other record; some users may provide their phone numbers, some may not.  Each record potentially has a different length and different values.

To store and retrieve this kind of data quickly, you generate a key for each record and then store whatever fields (what would have been columns in the table above) are available.  Each field is comprised of a data name and the data itself.  If you don’t have a particular piece of data, instead of leaving an empty cell in a table you simply don’t store the data name / data combination.

Let’s take a look:

Key: 1

ID: HS

First Name: Homer


Key: 2

Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

City: Springfield

Age: 34


Key: 3

Twitter ID: @hkrustofsky

First Name: Herschel

Occupation: Clown

As you can see, users can log in using ID, email, or Twitter ID.  This simply wouldn’t have been possible using a traditional table style RDBMS.  Also, queries need to be built around keys because there are no field (or column) names.  There’s no need to pull data from multiple tables, reformat it and import it into another table just so users with different information stored can log in.

NEC’s IERS takes advantage of the straightforward nature of a KVS.  I blogged about this a few weeks ago when I posted coverage of my interview with Atsushi Kitazawa, the “father” of IERS.  Due to the nature of a storing multiple values associated with a unique key, distributed KVS performance is predictable.  A KVS is usually partitioned to run on multiple nodes.  Because each key is unique, all values associated with a key, regardless of where the values are physically located, are equally accessible. 

So there you have it, an explanation of KVS’s and how they work.  While a KVS forms the foundation of NEC’s IERS, there are plenty of enhancements that take IERS above and beyond what the average KVS is capable of.  In particular, IERS provides a high-performance and consistent environment with transparent scaling for transactions.  My next posting will discuss these advantages and how to make the best use of them when developing for IERS.

To learn more about NEC’s IER’S solution visit:  http://goo.gl/TnFkbR

    *Matt Sarrel is a leading tech analyst and writer providing guest content for NEC.


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NEC Summer Reading List

 

Recently the Irving (TX) Public Library reported a 35% increase in its summer reading program from a year ago. This is good news for kiddos wanting to keep their minds active over the summer break. So that you can also keep your mind active, and because we did not want you to feel left out, we’ve compiled our own summer list of powerful informational topics. You can read or listen to great content and bone up on all things innovative, technical and positive for the society! Check out our sessions:

Solutions for Society

Solutions that make things better for society as a whole. Think about how much safer we are by being able to identify bad guys quickly with our NeoFace® facial recognition solutions. Many innovations positively impact society, from big data to healthcare innovation. Check it out…

From NECToday

What Do Intel’s Youngest Intern and NEC Have in Common?

Joey Hudy is the youngest intern in Intel history. At 16 years old, he has achieved multiple accomplishments including a solar-powered computer submitted at a recent science fair. His personal credo – Don’t be bored, make something – is a commitment from NEC as well.

Biometrics Can Improve Customer Experiences

According to a report from research firm Frost & Sullivan, biometrics is just beginning to gain recognition as a viable solution for customer experience in the retail and hospitality industries.

The biometric market is expected to be worth $6.2 billion by the year 2019, primarily due to the continued adoption of the technology for applications beyond the law enforcement and government arenas. For example, the banking industry has found biometric facial recognition to be quite useful in ATMs.

Big Data to the Rescue

What do Lady Gaga, the FIFA World Cup committee, and major communication companies have in common? Big data! Check out these real-life use cases to learn how big data significantly impacts the lives of just about everyone.

Healthcare Innovation for Improved Patient Experience

The primary objective of any healthcare provider is to focus on the patient. Whether it's a private practice or a large medical conglomeration, the healthcare system needs improved patient communication in order to ensure positive patient experiences.

From NECAM Soundcloud Channel

JPS Heath Network

JPS Health Network is the public healthcare system for Tarrant County and surrounding areas in Texas. Its flagship facility, JPS Hospital, is in Fort Worth and is the only Level-I Trauma Center in the county. The network also includes 42 primary and specialty clinics and health centers throughout the county to serve its population of approximately 2 million citizens. NEC helped JPS upgrade its communications platform to help staff and doctors deliver quality care to its patients.

Commonwealth of Pennsylvania – Justice Network

The Pennsylvania Justice Network (JNET) is a collaborative effort of 16 state agencies to build a secure, integrated justice system that promotes information sharing through the use of its applications, services, architecture, outreach and training.

Case Study: Children’s Hospital of Orange County

Named one of the best children’s hospitals by U.S. News & World Report (2013-2014), CHOC is exclusively committed to the health and well-being of children through clinical expertise, advocacy, outreach and research that brings advanced treatment to pediatric patients. 

Software-Defined Everything

The “Internet of Everything” taken to the next logical step – software-defined so it’s proactive, interactive and positive for companies who want to save time, money and improve productivity. Learn more about next-gen systems…

From NECToday

Continuous Availability at an Affordable Cost for Today’s Business

For IT organizations with mission-critical data, as well as large retailers needing to maintain and access data quickly, the requirements for server uptime and processing are even more important. Trying to achieve five nines (99.999%) of uptime is feasible in a clustered data center environment, but often these organizations are better served through the implementation of a fault tolerant (FT) server.

An Introduction to IERS and NoSQL / New SQL

NEC Corporation of America recently announced the general availability in North America of the InfoFrame Elastic Relational Store, a high-performance database built for high availability and flexible scalability.  IERS is a key value store that provides high-speed transaction processing and SQL (structured query language) capabilities through a JDBC/ODBC interface.  

An Interview with Atsushi Kitazawa of NEC Japan, the “Father” of IERS

Everything you wanted to know about IERS, from its position in the world of next-generation databases to its design goals, architecture, and prominent use cases.

From NECAM Soundcloud Channel

The Path to Five 9s of Availability for SQL Server

Get an overview of the different SQL Server high availability technologies from the lowest to the highest levels of availability.

Stay In the Know While On the Go

Mobility is only becoming more prevalent, so check out these great options to learn more about how to keep your mobile workforce productive, secure and well, mobile! Explore on the go…

From NECToday

Under the Sea…with Internet?

Can you imagine a world where ANYTHING is possible? Science fiction movies have depicted it: people living on the moon, on a planet, or under the sea. But now, are we coming closer to fantasy becoming a reality? Perhaps so!

How to Stay ‘Mobile’ During a Severe Weather Event

Enabling employees to do their jobs even when they can’t get into the office keeps them safe during dangerous travel conditions, but it also means not losing employee productivity over the course of the weather event.

Get the Best of All Worlds with In-Store Mobile

In-store mobility is the most efficient and accurate way to create the type of retail experience a consumer expects. Plus, it supports associates in providing a rapid response to a shopper’s needs, ensuring that the sale goes to your retail establishment. To understand the power of in-store mobile, first let’s understand the current consumer shopping behavior.

From NECAM Soundcloud Channel

Case Study: Schenectady City School District

Schenectady City School District (SCSD) is located 12 miles from Albany, New York. The district offers hundreds of courses and programs to nearly 10,000 students throughout the city of Schenectady, and has more National Board Certified Teachers (NBCT) than any other district in the state, with the exception of New York City.

It’s In the Cloud

Isn’t everything? Truth is that cloud solutions have significant practical applications for most businesses, if you understand how to apply them correctly. Do you need a hybrid, cloud or on-premises solution? Find out the answer to that question and more with these sessions:

From NECToday

Is Your Company Seeking Business Agility? Uncovering the Business Value of SDN

Hear first-hand SDN thought leaders from NEC, IBM and featured analyst firm Gartner Research talk about the business benefits of software-defined networking.

NEC Teams with Microsoft for Flexible, Open, Standards-based SDN for the Cloud

Mike Schutz, general manager of Microsoft Product Marketing for the Server and Tools Group, talks about the collaboration between these strategic partners and the benefits customers can expect in this new video.

Unified Communications: As-a-Service vs. On-Premises – What’s Best for You?

Simplifying communication and collaboration is the hallmark of UC and UCaaS. The good news is you don’t have to choose.

ONF Honors NEC as First Vendor to Certify for OpenFlow 1.0 Conformance

The Open Networking Foundation (ONF), a user-driven organization focused on the promotion and adoption of Software-defined Networking (SDN) through open standards development, has awarded NEC Corporation (NEC) with the first Certificate of Conformance offered through the ONF’s OpenFlow Conformance Testing Program. A Certificate of Conformance from ONF is the highest level of assurance available in the market today to confirm OpenFlow specification compliance.

NEC Collaborates with Microsoft to Transform the Data Center with Software-Defined Networking

Microsoft and NEC joint customers will command new levels of IT flexibility and automation with dynamic management and allocation of pooled network resources, as well as their compute and storage pools, all from a central point of control.

From NECAM Soundcloud Channel

Webinar: Real-Life SDN Use Cases

This webinar, Real-Life SDN Use Cases, features noted network experts Ivan Peplnjak of iosHints and NEC's network architect Samrat Ganguly. They present real examples of OpenFlow-based SDN at work, and use the NEC ProgrammableFlow® Networking Suite as the market leading vehicle to achieve transformative results.

There is plenty of other great content at your fingertips. Simply check out any one of our content channels and enjoy your own personalized summer reading program!

www.NECToday.com
http://www.youtube.com/interactivenec 
https://twitter.com/nec 
http://www.facebook.com/NECAmerica 
http://soundcloud.com/necam
https://www.linkedin.com/company/nec-corporation-of-america
 


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